Google Cracking Down On Fake Review Companies | Reputation Management | SEO | Online Reputation

fake-reviews

Looks like they (Google) don’t want “review stations” an example, an orthodontist that has a public pc for users to log in and write reviews on.. looks like they will target the IP address of the reviews to see if there is a pattern of reviews from the same computer for the same business and in addition to this possibly look at on the same PC if multiple accounts and reviews are being logged into to write reviews to try and stop the fake accounts. Hopefully they have addressed mobile users that share the WIFI at the places to write a review.. an prime example would be a restaurant or coffee shop that offers free wifi and people writing reviews on thier iphone for that restaurant or coffee shop.

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From GOOGLE:

  For reviewers:

  • Sometimes you may want to review multiple locations of the same business, such as your favorite fast food chain. Just remember to tailor each review to the specific location. Others will want to know what sets that location apart – be it the super friendly drive thru person, or maybe the unexpectedly awesome lake views.
  • Don’t write reviews for your current employer. We don’t allow reviews from current owners or employees.
  • Spam bots use URLs to redirect to other sites or potentially spread malware. We won’t show reviews with links, so, don’t put URLs in the text of your reviews

For business owners:

  • Be wary of an SEO or reputation management service that promises to generate reviews for your business. We’ve seen companies make up fake glowing testimonies — and we’ll take them down.
  • We don’t take down negative reviews for simply being negative for anyone, regardless of any other relationships with Google. Instead, we encourage you to utilize the owner response functionality to respond to the review and address the user’s concerns.
  • If a third party claims that they know how to remove reviews from Google, don’t believe them. Google does not work with any third party reputation management companies and we certainly don’t remove reviews unless they violate our guidelines.
  • Don’t set up a computer or tablet device in your place of business for customers to leave reviews on site. Consider sending a reminder e-mail so customers can review on their own time.
  • Remember, we don’t allow you to give customers free gifts or discounts for leaving reviews.

For SEOs:

  • If a business accepts paper comment cards it might be tempting to collect them and “digitize” them by posting the reviews on Google+ Local. We ask that all reviews come from first hand experience and do not allow posting reviews on behalf of others.

 http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2241393/Google-Warns-SEO-Businesses-to-Avoid-Fake-Reviews’

http://productforums.google.com/forum/#!category-topic/business/HjNuoboBL1A

 

How to deal with negative reviews about your business | Online Reputation | Review Sites

I have seen business owners so consumed over negative reviews they lose attention to doing what they need to be doing.. running they’re business. A negative review can consume and devour the mind of a business owner, especially one that take great pride in thier work. Here are the top 3 tips to get help with a possible fake negative review.

  1. Never comment or reply to point out that it’s a fake complaint. Even if it is – and even if you have proof. It’ll only make you seem argumentative and it creates doubt and distrust. Remember: how you conduct yourself professionally online reflects on your business, it is important to focus the attention away from the negative comment and towards a solution to make things right;  that’s going to win over new customers in the end.
  2. Try to flag the review so that website administrator can remove it. Sites like Yelp and Google’s Place Pages offer a way for users to flag reviews as inappropriate. This process is not immediate, however, and won’t guarantee that a flagged review will get removed or even filtered out of view going forward. This approach is more “crossed fingers” than “set in stone,” but it has a better chance of working if the review in question contains profanity, personal attacks, or is generally off-topic and unprofessional.
  3. Rally your fans, followers and favorite customers to flood sites with positivity. Remember, it’sagainst FTC Guidelines to offer any financial incentive in exchange for online reviews. But it’s well within your right to ask your loyal customers and advocates to post their own reviews out of the kindness of their hearts. When it comes to putting online reviews into context (LifeHacker andThe Consumerist both have great guides on this), both quality and quantity come into play. So encourage your happy customers to share their authentic experiences in clear, appropriate language to help balance the conversation about your business reputation online.

Want to learn more? give me a call. Talal

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